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Antigua & Barbuda

Mission Accomplished CARICOM Stakeholders Welcome Loss & Damage Win from Climate Summit

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Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt. Wednesday, November 23, 2022. Stakeholders from

Caribbean small island developing states (SIDS) have welcomed the decision to

establish a loss and damage response fund from the recently concluded United

Nations Climate Conference (COP27) in Egypt.

“We have literally exhausted all of our efforts … to bring home the climate

action commitments our vulnerable people desperately need,” said the Hon.

Minister Molwyn Joseph of Antigua and Barbuda, chair of the Alliance of Small Island

Developing States (AOSIS), in a statement issued Sunday (November 20).

“Our Ministers and negotiators have endured sleepless nights and endless

days in an intense series of negotiations, determined to secure the establishment of

a loss and damage response fund, keep 1.5 alive, and advance ambition on critical

mitigation and adaptation plans,” he added.

AOSIS has represented the interests of some 39 SIDS and low-lying coastal

developing states for more than two decades in climate negotiations and sustainable

development processes.

Labelled a breakthrough decision, the agreement to establish a loss and

damage fund forms a part of a package of decisions from the international

negotiations.

It follows years of deliberations on the call for financial support to help

developing countries respond post climate-related impacts, including livelihoods

loss; and the addition of loss and damage to the COP agenda for the first time.

However, even as stakeholders celebrate, they are mindful of the work ahead

to operationalise the fund.

Executive Director (ED) of the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre,

Dr. Colin Young, said while the hard fought-for loss and damage decision was

certainly welcomed, it is now time to ensure the fund becomes operational and

benefits SIDS and other developing countries.

“The details will need to be worked out; the criteria established and the

sources identified.

The design of the fund must be fit for purpose and not repeat the

mistakes of other funds that are very difficult to access and take years,” said the ED,

who was in Egypt from November 6 to 18 for the UN Climate Talks.

UnaMay Gordon, former principal director for the Climate Change Division of

Jamaica, and who has herself been on the frontlines at many global climate

negotiations, agreed.

“This was a great step forward, but it is the first step. Eyes will now focus on

construction of the transitional committee and the beginning of their deliberations. I

do hope the fight for loss and damage gets easier from here on,” she noted, fresh

from her participation in the Egypt COP.

“It should not be so hard to agree on something everybody agrees needed to

be addressed. But as I said earlier, good sense must prevail,” added Gordon, who is

also the Chairperson of the Board of Directors at the CCCCC.

AOSIS, meanwhile, has long championed financial support for loss and

damage in the developing world and only last month published a briefing document

detailing how a ‘fit-for-purpose multilateral fund designated as an operating entity

of the UNFCCC Financial Mechanism’ should work.

AOSIS’ membership (roughly 39 countries) which includes Caribbean SIDS,

have called for the design and operationalisation of the fund to include important

concepts such as “climate justice” when taking action to address climate change as

outlined in the Paris Agreement; and flagged the need for an operating entity that is

built to provide predictable support for ex-post response to loss and damage.

Beyond that, AOSIS has maintained that the programming of support should

take a “country-owned, country-driven, gender-responsive approach” and “with

operational modalities that realise enhanced direct access, especially through

existing regional and national entities.”

For further information, contact:

Mrs. Indi McLymont-Lafayette, Communications Specialist, Email: [email protected]

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Antigua & Barbuda

Children and elderly among those to benefit from new volunteer venture

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The organisation has been lending a hand to some of the nation’s vulnerable residents (Photos contributed)

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A string of local causes have benefited from a new volunteer programme operating in Antigua and Barbuda.

SkyTigerCares was formed from outsourcing and offshoring consulting firm SkyTiger, based at Canada Place, St John’s.

A food drive for the Fiennes Institute, supported by SkyTiger staff, secured $1,500 worth of food and personal care items. In addition to the care packages, $5,000 was also donated to the Master of Fiennes, Walton Edwards.

In July, the philanthropic organisation supported the West Indies Sail Heritage Foundation by donating $5,000 to the tall ship race event in the Netherlands.

“In addition to financial assistance, our very own employee and aspiring sailor J-maiah Louisor was able to participate in the event,” a release from SkyTiger said. “In his words, it was a dream come true and he felt privileged and honoured to be selected for this once-in-a-lifetime event.”

The organisation also helped local schoolchildren last summer by issuing 105 gift certificates to staff members with children between the ages of three and 17.

The volunteer programme focuses on four pillars of corporate social responsibility – environmental, ethical, philanthropic, and economic.

“We embrace diversity, inclusion, social awareness, volunteering, education, eco-friendly practices, and acts of service,” the release added.

“At SkyTiger, one of our top priorities is to be a good corporate citizen. We want to create an environment that recognises the importance of giving back.”

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Messi scores, Argentina beats Australia 2-1 at World Cup

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Antigua & Barbuda

Haitian police are fed up!!

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A high-ranking police officer says gangs in Haiti are making their lives very difficult and they are challenged in executing their functions.

Over the past few months, Haitian gangsters have seized at least three police vehicles, which includes two armored ones, in a wave of gang violence that has left several law enforcement officers dead.

A police source, told HCNN that an armored vehicle and several police weapons were hijacked and are still in the hands of the criminals who are still using them to fight rival gangs.

“As a police commissioner, I feel embarrassed and guilty, because I am among those who are supposed to make sure that gang violence is quelled and that security is guaranteed,” he said

He says there have been numerous times he considered resigning but has been advised against it.

One gang leader, a former policeman known as Crisla, has claimed responsibility for the seizure of the vehicles.

A spokesman for the Haitian National Police Union, Lionel Lazare, said at least 50 policemen have been shot dead, since the beginning of the year.

Police commissioner, in charge of the police academy, 50-year-old Harington Rigaud, was among the victims who were shot in the head, outside his office, on November 25.

His vehicle was also taken by the criminals.



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