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Grenada

Debra St Bernard is back as head of the Public Service Commission

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Female attorney-at-law Debra St Bernard is the new head of the Public Service Commission (PSC).

St Bernard, a former public officer in the Ministry of Finance and also the Ministry of Legal Affairs, took the oath of office Monday afternoon from Governor General Dame Cecile La Grenade.

The new commission members met with the island’s female head of state hours after the outgoing body, headed by former Cabinet Secretary, Beryl Isaac held its weekly Monday session.

It is the second stint for the attorney-at-law at the commission after serving in the body during the 2008-13 period in government of the National Democratic Congress (NDC) of then Prime Minister Tillman Thomas.

St Bernard is currently employed with the law firm of Lewis & Renwick in the city and specialises mainly in civil law.

The new body will be considered as more sympathetic to the new Congress administration as Isaac was often seen as an ally of the defeated New National Party (NNP) administration of Dr. Keith Mitchell.

Several public officers had expressed concern over the manner in which Isaac moved within a week from being Cabinet Secretary to the then Ministers of Government, to take charge of the PSC which is recognised by the constitution as the legal body for the hiring and firing of public officers.

The relationship has been rather tense between the new NDC government of Prime Minister Dickon Mitchell and the Isaac-led PSC.

Speculation is rife that the names of a number of persons sent to the PSC for appointment since the change of government on June 23 have met with some degree of resistance especially from Isaac.

Prime Minister Dickon Mitchell told close aides that he would wait out the term of Isaac before making further approaches to the PSC to make some critical appointments as part of the Transformational Agenda that Congress campaigned on to defeat the NNP regime and to win the June 23 election.

Informed sources told THE NEW TODAY that there were often disagreements between Isaac and other members on a number of issues sent by the previous government for ratification.

According to one insider, Isaac would often be a lone figure at meetings not giving support to issues sent by the government for ratification and would give instructions to enter in the record book that she did not agree with the decisions taken by the majority serving on the body.

The two other government representatives on the PSC not kept by the new Congress administration were Prescott Swan and Greta Franklyn, who have been replaced by Bernard Antoine and Faye Thompson.

Antoine, a former public officer in the 1980’s is qualified in the field of Human Resource and also worked for several years in the private sector including St George’s University (SGU).

Thompson, a former bank employee is known to be closely aligned to Congress and played a role in the campaign for the June general election especially in the South St George Constituency.

The Public Workers Union (PWU) has opted to keep its outgoing representative Judy Benoit on the commission while the Grenada Union of Teachers (GUT) replaced the ailing Delano Viechweg with former school principal, Jim Alexander who was attached to Mc Donald College in St. Patrick.



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Grenada

“Sukie” – A repeated offender

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Controversial Dominica entertainer 36-year old Shane “Sukie Burn Brain” Edwards is once again in trouble with the law but not in his homeland.

Known by others as “Sukie”, the artiste was arrested in Grenada last weekend and charged by police with one count of Indecent Assault.

Several Dominicans are not surprised at the arrest with many describing the entertainer as a time bomb when it comes to running into trouble with the law.

One Dominican told THE NEW TODAY that “Sukie” is considered as a “repeated” offender and is not considered as “a favourite” in the country.

“He is challenged with good discipline and regularly in trouble with the law. Members of the public tried and continue to try to assist him to be a good citizen but he is not showing sign of coming around,” he said.

The Dominican also pointed to allegations surrounding Sukie of sexual misconduct on a visit to neighbouring St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

“There was a report where Sukie went to SVG and did the same thing as in Grenada with a 15 year old but for some strange reason was given a slap on the hand and there was no charge filed,” he remarked.

According to the Dominican resident, many have always been fearful that he will cause embarrassment to the country.

Sukie was also arrested in Dominica and charged with battery on a female and threat and was remanded in custody for the alleged offence.

However, he was given bail after a month in the lock up.

His trial for the offence of threat and battery is scheduled for a hearing in the Roseau Magistrate court on Tuesday.

Since his release in October, the artist has performed at many events around the Caribbean region.

The entertainer travelled to Grenada over the weekend to perform alongside other artistes but was picked up by Police on Friday night following a criminal complaint from a guest who was staying at the same hotel with him.

Sukie was charged on Saturday, was denied bail and could not perform at the show.

He appeared before Chief Magistrate Teddy St Louis on Monday but was again denied bail and sent to the Richmond Hill prison on Remand.

Under Grenada’s Criminal Code, the charge of “indecent assault” is a summary offence that carries a maximum prison sentence of 5 years.



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Anguilla

History & culture of the eastern Caribbean islands

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The Eastern Caribbean is a region that includes a number of small island nations and territories in the Caribbean Sea. These islands have a rich history and culture that have been shaped by a variety of influences, including African, Caribbean, European, and indigenous peoples.

The first inhabitants of the Eastern Caribbean were indigenous peoples who migrated to the region thousands of years ago. These people included the Arawaks, Caribs, and Tainos, who were skilled farmers, fishermen, and craftsmen.

The first European explorers to reach the Eastern Caribbean were the Spanish, who arrived in the region in the late 15th century. The Spanish claimed the islands for their own and began to establish settlements, plantations, and mines. However, they were soon challenged by the English, French, and Dutch, who also wanted to control the region.

The Eastern Caribbean became a battleground for these European powers, who fought over control of the islands for more than two centuries. The islands were eventually divided among the European powers, with the English, French, and Dutch each controlling a number of islands.

During this period, the islands became a melting pot of cultures, with African slaves brought to the region to work on the plantations, and Europeans, Africans, and indigenous peoples mixing and intermingling. This led to the development of a unique culture and identity for the Eastern Caribbean, which is still evident today.

Today, the Eastern Caribbean is a diverse and vibrant region with a rich history and culture. The islands are known for their beautiful beaches, stunning natural scenery, and vibrant music and dance traditions. The region also has a thriving tourism industry, with many visitors coming to the islands to experience the unique culture and beauty of the Eastern Caribbean.

In addition to its rich history and culture, the Eastern Caribbean is also known for its natural beauty. The islands are home to a variety of landscapes, including white sandy beaches, lush rainforests, and mountains. The region is also home to a number of protected areas and national parks, which are home to a wide variety of flora and fauna, including many species that are found nowhere else in the world.

The Eastern Caribbean is also an important economic region, with many of the islands relying on tourism as a major source of income. The region is also known for its production of spices, particularly nutmeg, which is one of the main exports of the region. In addition, the islands are home to a number of small-scale industries, including fishing, agriculture, and manufacturing.

The Eastern Caribbean is also a popular destination for sailors, with many of the islands offering excellent sailing conditions and a number of marinas and yacht clubs. The region is also home to a number of major sailing events, including the Atlantic Rally for Cruisers and the Caribbean 600 race.

Overall, the Eastern Caribbean is a fascinating and diverse region with a rich history, culture, and natural beauty. The islands offer a wide range of activities and attractions for visitors to enjoy, from relaxing on beautiful beaches to exploring the region’s vibrant culture and history.

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Grenada

Dominican Entertainer Jailed for Six Months

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A Dominican entertainer has been sentenced to six months in prison here, on a conviction of two counts of indecent assault.

Chief Magistrate, Teddy St. Louis sent Shane Edwards, aka, Sunkie to jail today, Friday December 2 after he was arrested on Saturday for inappropriately touching a female.

Edwards, 36, an entertainer from Roseau Dominica was in Grenada to perform at a show last Saturday evening



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