Connect with us

Anguilla

ALHCS New Young Progressive Debate Finals – The Anguillian Newspaper – The Weekly Independent Paper of Anguilla

Published

on


The annual New Young Progressjve Debaters (NYPD) Debate Finals was held at the Teachers’ Resource Centre on Saturday, July 9th, 2022 at 7 pm – in front of a large physical an d virtual audience. The finalists of this debate involved four debaters, namely Yazel Simon and Kishanece Edwards (Proposition) and Taijanique Serpersaud and Jahvie Hamilton (Opposition). These finalists had participated in several debates with other NYPD debate members in the past few weeks, which they won, allowing them to participate in the finals.

After a brief prayer by Abigail Campbell, the Honourable Mr. José Vanterpool gave some opening remarks on the impact of debate, saying that “the debating society has truly been the biggest aspect that has shaped my life going forward – in terms of how I approach things from a multitude of different angles.” He encouraged those in primary school, and those in high school who haven’t already, to join the debate clubs.

Judges (Ms. Meekia Harrigan, Ms. Lyse-Andria Franklin, Ms. Alysha Carty, Mr. Aaivor Adams and Ms. Electa Adams) deliberating.

The moot of the debate finals was “With the opening of the new campus, school hours at the A.L.H.C.S. should revert to 8 am to 3 pm.” The moderator of this debate was Mr. Colin Johnson and, in his charismatic, entertaining style, told the audience that “although the winners may not necessarily change the school hours, what I will try to do is make it accessible to the powers who can. You mightn’t change it, but what we are doing is opening their ears, eyes and nose so that they can smell and feel you, and know how you’re thinking.”

The judges of the NYPD Debate finals were members from the Literary and Debating Society which is the senior debate club at the Albena Lake Hodge Comprehensive School. They were Ms. Alysha Carty (Head Judge), Ms. Meekia Harrigan, Ms. Lyse-Andria Franklin and Mr. Aaivor Adams (Best speaker judge). The time keeper was Ms. Electa Adams. Immediately before the releasing of results, the Head Judge, Ms. Alysha Carty, commended the debaters and supporters at the debate. She then went on to say, “We appreciated how the debaters performed, and we encourage that these performances be enhanced using body language, facial expressions, and hand gestures. The familiarity of the script would also help with enhancing these areas. We do appreciate the effort of the debaters conducting surveys and reaching out to people who would be able to give relevant answers”.
The results were presented by Mr. Colin Johnson and the scores were as follows:

Proposition:
Yazel Simon (1st speaker) – 61 points
Kishanece Edwards (2nd speaker) – 56 points
Total – 117 points

Opposition:
Taijanique Serpersaud (1st speaker) – 76 points
Jahvie Hamilton (2nd speaker) – 58 points
Total – 134 points

The Opposition won the debate, and their 1st speaker, Taijanique Serpersaud, also won best speaker of the night for her exceptional performance. Mr. Aaivor Adams, the best speaker judge, commented on the positive aspects of the performances of everyone, saying “we definitely had great clarity tonight, as well as the grammar in the debates.” He noted that Taijanique Serpersaud received a total of 27 out of 30 points based on the best speaker criteria.

Best Speaker, Taijanique Serpersaud

Many awards were presented – afterwards by the Honourable Premier, Dr. Ellis L. Webster, and the current principal of the ALHCS, Mrs. Rita Carty – to the debate members and groups who did exceptionally well throughout the debating period. Tyjanique also walked away with the best speaker award for year two , overall best speaker and the finals best speaker. Kishanece Edwards was awarded the most outstanding participation and best speaker Year One. Yazel Simon also won the most helpful award. The third place went to Taimayah Brooks and Timothy Monsanto. Jamoi Hodge won the best new debater award while Alejandra Butler was awarded the most improved debater. Awards also went to Delicia Harrigan for outstanding participation, Rhia Williams for being the most courageous debater and Jernai Weeks won the fair play award. In the impromptu speech contest , Abigail Campbell placed fifth, Timothy Mosanto placed 4th, Rohan Richardson placed third while Yazel Simon placed second and Kishanece Edwards was first. The NYPD would like to thank the following persons and businesses for their outstanding contributions: Anguilla Air Services, Mr Jamie Hodge, Mr Kerith Kentish, The Honorable Doctor Lorenzo Webster, The Honorable Dee- Anne Kentish Rogers, The Honorable Quincy Gumbs Marie, The Honorable Jose Vanterpool, Nakishma Rogers, Mr and Mrs Rocco Rosano, UR Choice Take Out and Catering Services, Miss Roxanne Benjamin, the principal of the ALHCS , Mrs Rita Carty, the staff at customs, Kool FM, Gaf and staff , Rhonica Connor, Barbara Webster Bourne, Deavene and Monica Guishard, Gweneth Johnson, Yazel Simon and her support groups , Keith Fabian and all those persons who in any way contributed or supported the NYPD 2022. Once again, Thanks to all!

– Contributed



Source link
All rights/copyrights of the text and imagery belong to their respective owner, we do NOT claim any ownership.

DISCLAIMER:
Underneath Part 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “honest use” for functions akin to criticism, remark, information reporting, instructing, scholarship, and analysis. Honest use is a use permitted by copyright statute that may in any other case be infringing.”

Continue Reading

Anguilla

History & culture of the eastern Caribbean islands

Published

on

The Eastern Caribbean is a region that includes a number of small island nations and territories in the Caribbean Sea. These islands have a rich history and culture that have been shaped by a variety of influences, including African, Caribbean, European, and indigenous peoples.

The first inhabitants of the Eastern Caribbean were indigenous peoples who migrated to the region thousands of years ago. These people included the Arawaks, Caribs, and Tainos, who were skilled farmers, fishermen, and craftsmen.

The first European explorers to reach the Eastern Caribbean were the Spanish, who arrived in the region in the late 15th century. The Spanish claimed the islands for their own and began to establish settlements, plantations, and mines. However, they were soon challenged by the English, French, and Dutch, who also wanted to control the region.

The Eastern Caribbean became a battleground for these European powers, who fought over control of the islands for more than two centuries. The islands were eventually divided among the European powers, with the English, French, and Dutch each controlling a number of islands.

During this period, the islands became a melting pot of cultures, with African slaves brought to the region to work on the plantations, and Europeans, Africans, and indigenous peoples mixing and intermingling. This led to the development of a unique culture and identity for the Eastern Caribbean, which is still evident today.

Today, the Eastern Caribbean is a diverse and vibrant region with a rich history and culture. The islands are known for their beautiful beaches, stunning natural scenery, and vibrant music and dance traditions. The region also has a thriving tourism industry, with many visitors coming to the islands to experience the unique culture and beauty of the Eastern Caribbean.

In addition to its rich history and culture, the Eastern Caribbean is also known for its natural beauty. The islands are home to a variety of landscapes, including white sandy beaches, lush rainforests, and mountains. The region is also home to a number of protected areas and national parks, which are home to a wide variety of flora and fauna, including many species that are found nowhere else in the world.

The Eastern Caribbean is also an important economic region, with many of the islands relying on tourism as a major source of income. The region is also known for its production of spices, particularly nutmeg, which is one of the main exports of the region. In addition, the islands are home to a number of small-scale industries, including fishing, agriculture, and manufacturing.

The Eastern Caribbean is also a popular destination for sailors, with many of the islands offering excellent sailing conditions and a number of marinas and yacht clubs. The region is also home to a number of major sailing events, including the Atlantic Rally for Cruisers and the Caribbean 600 race.

Overall, the Eastern Caribbean is a fascinating and diverse region with a rich history, culture, and natural beauty. The islands offer a wide range of activities and attractions for visitors to enjoy, from relaxing on beautiful beaches to exploring the region’s vibrant culture and history.

Continue Reading

Anguilla

SDA Church Hosts Sunday Evening Concert with US Gospel Music Professional – The Anguillian Newspaper – The Weekly Independent Paper of Anguilla

Published

on


Orlan Johnson, Zina Johnson and Edmond Charles greeted
by Dwayniqua Proctor on arrival
Mr. Marcus Smith
Mr. Vernon Rogers

A team of gospel musicians arrived on the island this week from Washington, DC, to conduct a special concert at the Mount Fortune Seventh-day Adventist Church on Sunday evening, 24th July. The concert, dubbed “The Return”, is organized by a committee led by SDA’s Choir Director, Marcia Hodge.
The visiting team of musicians includes: Zina Johnson, the Choir Director and Psalmist; Edmond Charles, the Organist; and Marcus Smith, the Pianist. All three gospel music enthusiasts were meticulously chosen for the occasion by an ardent music leader of the church, Vernon Elrado “Rado” Rogers, a well known Anguillian who resides in Baltimore, Maryland. Mr. Rogers commented on his selection of the visiting musicians and expectations for Sunday evening’s event:

“The local churches Director, Marcia Hodge approached me some time ago,” he said, “asking me to assist her in organising a special musical event for the church. She wanted this to be a concert with a higher level of performance created by gospel music professionals. I sing with the Baltimore Community Choir, and I am privileged to know skilful performers in the gospel music area. So I set about selecting the best individuals with whom I am familiar.

“I think these three individuals, Zina, Edmond and Marcus, are ideal performers/ministers for what we intend to present to the public on Sunday night,” Rado remarked. “People sometimes forget that gospel music is a sermon – it is not a show. We are going to prove that on Sunday evening.

“We expect a great turnout for “The Return”, when we will reveal that gospel music is a force to reckon with, as long as it is presented with the anointing of the Holy Spirit. We intend to impact the audience with a rich gospel-oriented musical experience.

The concert, “The Return”, will take place on Sunday evening at 5:00 at the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Mount Fortune. A love offering will be collected.



Source link
All rights/copyrights of the text and imagery belong to their respective owner, we do NOT claim any ownership.

DISCLAIMER:
Underneath Part 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “honest use” for functions akin to criticism, remark, information reporting, instructing, scholarship, and analysis. Honest use is a use permitted by copyright statute that may in any other case be infringing.”

Continue Reading

Anguilla

REVENUE-GENERATION THROUGH TAXATION – The Anguillian Newspaper – The Weekly Independent Paper of Anguilla

Published

on


As the world contemplates the issue of a global recession that could have deep and lasting impacts on how we survive – even within the Caribbean region – it is imperative that we in Anguilla become very proactive. By that, we should be considering how we can take measures to cut the overall cost of running our country – Anguilla.
It seems as though government after government has ignored the need to engage in austerity measures to reduce public expenditure and creatively expand the economy. Instead, they take the easy way out and allow the ‘status quo’ to continue.

As each successive government finds it more and more challenging to manage the cost associated with running the country, the government of the day appears to seek comfort in the ‘status quo’ approach – generating new revenue through taxation.
Notably, there are significant problems that naturally lend themselves to this approach: it increases the cost of living for the people and residents of Anguilla; it makes Anguilla seem unattractive to visitors in terms of the cost to visit; and it discourages people from wanting to do business in Anguilla – all of which have a negative economic impact on the island.
In effect, the ‘status quo’ of revenue-generation primarily through taxation displaces some of our people, especially our young people who find it more and more unbearable to live in Anguilla. In order to survive or have a decent standard of living for themselves, their families and future families, they ‘throw their hands up in the air’ and migrate to the UK or to the US. When they migrate to other lands, we in Anguilla lose generations of working-class people who are not contributing to the social security scheme in Anguilla or to the economy and overall development of this country. When that happens, the country dies – its youth move away with no real prospects of ever returning home to live.
Looking at this problem wholistically, it is important that we create and actively seek out economic opportunities that attract our young people who have migrated out of Anguilla to return home, and that we retain our youth in this country within the workforce.
Whereas, the population in most of the region has grown substantially over the years, the population in Anguilla has grown very little. There was a time when Anguilla’s population outnumbered that of the BVI, of St Maarten, and of the Turks and Caicos Islands. Instead of growing, Anguilla today is experiencing an exodus of human capital, especially among our young people who are leaving Anguilla in search of better living opportunities elsewhere.

The ‘status quo’ of revenue-generation primarily through taxation makes Anguilla less attractive as a destination choice for visitors on limited budgets. Anguilla will probably always be a niche destination for high-end vacationers who tend to purchase all-inclusive vacation packages resulting in major spending profits going off island to the hotel property owners and investors.
The ‘status quo’ of revenue-generation primarily through taxation also forces would-be investors to not come to Anguilla to do business, but instead, to choose other jurisdictions that are just as appealing as Anguilla, but where the labour is cheaper, the water is cheaper and the electricity is cheaper. While Anguilla has ‘a very pretty expensive offering’ – sun, sea, and sand – it would still be ignored for other places with ‘many very pretty affordable offerings’ – sun, sea, sand, good-paying jobs, readily available goods, easy access to essential services, and affordable living, etc.
So, when we talk about austerity and finding creative ways of cutting cost in Anguilla, it is imperative that we act on it, because to not do so is having all kinds of negative impacts on our country – impacts on the population, on inward and foreign investment, on people’s quality of life and on the overall cost of living.
There have been so many missed opportunities for the governments of Anguilla to abandon the ‘status quo’ draconian mentality of entitlement, turn Anguilla around and steady her on an upward and forward trajectory.
There have been opportunities to move some of the public service workforce into the private sector workforce. There have been opportunities to address issues of redundancy, efficiency and productivity within the public service and government statutory bodies. There have been opportunities for government to reduce the size of its ground transportation fleets and cut back on its electricity and telephone usage – especially during off-peak hours.
Post Hurricane Irma Anguilla received large amounts of money from the UK Government in relief assistance and, with it, the government of the day moved with great haste to construct a number of needed buildings across the island. However, the extravagant size of those buildings comes with an increased consumption of everything needed to keep them operating. This too, adds to the cost of running the country putting more burden on a declining population.
Unless past governments, this government, and future governments, lose ‘the status quo’ and realise the need to streamline the cost of running Anguilla, it is unlikely that the cost of living in Anguilla will improve significantly. It is unlikely that the economy of Anguilla will realise much growth. It is unlikely that we will be able to attract many people to stay in Anguilla and keep its operations going year-round. It is unlikely that investors will consider Anguilla to be an appealing destination in which to invest.
The recent introduction of the Goods and Services Tax (GST) in addition to the Interim Stabilisation Tax, and all these knock-on effects, have also added to the cost of living and doing business in Anguilla. As a result, the residents, local businesses, local and foreign investors, as well as potential investors, are all suffering. The ‘status quo’ of entitlement and revenue-generation through taxation is taking Anguilla nowhere – quickly!



Source link
All rights/copyrights of the text and imagery belong to their respective owner, we do NOT claim any ownership.

DISCLAIMER:
Underneath Part 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “honest use” for functions akin to criticism, remark, information reporting, instructing, scholarship, and analysis. Honest use is a use permitted by copyright statute that may in any other case be infringing.”

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2022 EC Net News - News since 2004 (Syndicated News Feed) Copyrights belong to their owners